Composite Sidewalk Jul27

Composite Sidewalk

Okay, okay… a distributor/contact couldn’t imagine how a CG-sidewalk could be put into a live scene. (even in this day and age)

Well, this is shot #77 from the Vegas sequence in our movie. (that little sidewalk thingy spins, twirls, and breaks apart later). A little dirt, a little feathering, and some out-of-focus does wonders for a composite.

Okay, okay… a distributor/contact couldn’t imagine how a CG-sidewalk could be put into a live scene. (even in this day and age) Well, this is shot #77 from the Vegas sequence in our movie. (that little sidewalk thingy spins, twirls, and breaks apart later). A little dirt, a little...

Floating Sidewalk Jul26

Floating Sidewalk

A key “character” in the visual effects sequence for our movie involved a piece of sidewalk, floating up, and breaking apart.

A fellow filmmaker stopped by and watched the CG-sidewalk get created in 3-easy steps. Over drinks, we completed the key CG “character” and wrote this in-depth tutorial… step #1: model; step #2: texture; step #3 render.

After that, the filmmaker affectionately named the CG asset, ‘the steak’ … and promptly got hungry.

A key “character” in the visual effects sequence for our movie involved a piece of sidewalk, floating up, and breaking apart. A fellow filmmaker stopped by and watched the CG-sidewalk get created in 3-easy steps. Over drinks, we completed the key CG “character” and wrote this in-depth tutorial… step #1: model; step #2: texture; step #3 render. After that, the filmmaker affectionately named the CG asset, ‘the steak’ … and promptly got hungry. Permanent link to this post (74 words, estimated 18 secs reading...

CG Sidewalk Jul21

CG Sidewalk

The full CG render of the sidewalk BEFORE all of the cover-up smoke/dirt/shadows get added to the composite. Sure, the before-shot could have been created with a simple image composite… but, then you’d miss the opportunity to have a wireframe to use in the after-shot pavement break up. Rayfire was used to create cracks in the wireframe. Z-Brush was used to create surface displacement that forced the shadows to behave properly during the sidewalk break up.

The full CG render of the sidewalk BEFORE all of the cover-up smoke/dirt/shadows get added to the composite. Sure, the before-shot could have been created with a simple image composite… but, then you’d miss the opportunity to have a wireframe to use in the after-shot pavement...

Flyby Obelisk Jul04

Flyby Obelisk

The obelisk was remodeled using high polycount modeling instead of using a low polycount model with normal/displacement maps. The increased photorealistic quality was achieved with SHORTER render times. Mental Ray inside 3DS Max enjoys working with vertices in a faster way than it does with normal/displacment maps. That’s fine, since importing normal/displacement maps from ZBrush into 3DS Max requires the kind of tweaking that can add significant modeling time.

The obelisk was remodeled using high polycount modeling instead of using a low polycount model with normal/displacement maps. The increased photorealistic quality was achieved with SHORTER render times. Mental Ray inside 3DS Max enjoys working with vertices in a faster way than it does with...

Wireframe UAV Feb08

Wireframe UAV

Whether a movie scene involves live actors or CG models, decisions about camera placement is required. The following shot is of a CG UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) fly-by for an action sequence over Las Vegas in our independent movie, “Dominant Gene“.

Only a few years ago, a typical director’s job was over once principal photography was done. In some cases, decisions about character placement, camera selection and even colour timing and mood were deferred to the computer effects people… I’m thinking of “Vidocq” here (one of the earliest all-digital, theatrically released movies).

Whether a movie scene involves live actors or CG models, decisions about camera placement is required. The following shot is of a CG UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) fly-by for an action sequence over Las Vegas in our independent movie, “Dominant Gene“. Only a few years ago, a typical director’s job was over once principal photography was done. In some cases, decisions about character placement, camera selection and even colour timing and mood were deferred to the computer effects people… I’m thinking of “Vidocq” here (one of the earliest all-digital, theatrically released movies). Read the full post...